CAN SOMEONE FORCIBLY TAKE YOUR GUN? LEARN HOW DEFENSIBLE EACH HOLSTER IS NOW!

Spread the love

How Defensible is Your Holster?

If you own a handgun and carry it either for work, or personal protection, it is essential that you have the control on your weapon. If you don’t maintain the control on your firearm, it may because of a safety risk to you, to your loved one, or anyone else nearby you. Maintaining control involves ensuring the weapon is properly holstered and the holster also fits you properly. Your handgun does not fall out during any physical activities bending over, running, or jumping. It also requires you to secure your firearms in a safe when not in use and you have controlled access to the safe.

Weapons Retention

While carrying a firearm, weapon retention is an important consideration. Weapons retention is the practice of maintaining control of your weapon during a physical confrontation. This may include any attempt by one or more hostile persons to grab your firearm from its holster without provocation, take your gun in the middle of a struggle, or grab your weapon after you have drawn it. It’s an important skill to have, and to master, it has to be practiced. It will ensure that, when the occasion arises, you will respond appropriately. Failure to practice good retention of arms will lead your attacker to gain control of your weapon, which will not end well for you or your loved ones. Retention of weapons starts with situational awareness-understanding what’s happening around you. There’s nothing worse than being blinded by a potential threat because you have little time to process what’s going on, let alone react appropriately. Carrying your weapon concealed also gives you a huge advantage over adversaries, as they don’t know you’re armed. Open carry is not suitable in an urban area but it is perfect for camping and outdoor activities. It marks you as a target for aggressive people when your weapon is on show in a holster, which can leave you exposed to unprovoked gun-grabbing when you are distracted or fail to pay attention to your surroundings. Guns should be heard and not seen – that is, when you draw them to engage in an active threat, the only time anyone should know that you’re carrying a weapon. Carrying concealed greatly decreases the risk for unprovoked gun grabs and, should you have to protect yourself, gives you a much-needed element of surprise. So, you’re wearing a properly fitted holster and having good situational awareness – if you get into a fight, gun protection training should help you keep your weapon under control if anyone tries to take it from you. Holsters with built-in protections for the protection of firearms will greatly improve your ability to retain control of your firearm during a confrontation. How defensible your holster is will depend on the direction the attacker is attacking you from. For instance, if your opponent is in front of you, carrying an appendix, cross-draw or shoulder holster would place the weapon within the threat’s grabbing reach. Conversely, if your attacker comes at you from behind, whether it’s in a hip or small-of-back holster, they’ll be within the range of your target. In this article, we will look at how defensible each type of holster is from the standpoint of directional attacks – from the front, rear, and sides – while also considering your ability to defend yourself during the struggle.

Shoulder Holsters

The shoulder holder is carried under your support arm, with the grip facing forward. A shoulder holster has the greatest advantage of being one of the few holsters that bring the handgun above the waistline. With minimal printing, it hides very well under a jacket. The most appropriate use for shoulder holster is for people who drive frequently, either for business or pleasure. If you need to defend yourself from a hostile situation while in your vehicle, such as carjacking, shoulder cushions help avoid the tangle of the seatbelt. This type of holster is easy to hide and is not easily accessed by an attacker, but has to reach across your body in order to also limit that arm’s ability to block attacks. However, in the following cases, this holster has a few disadvantages from the point of view of the retention of weapons, which are outlined below:- 1. The first is that you have to get across your body to draw your weapon. When you do that, an assailant in front of you could grab your arm and pin it to your chest – both of which would prevent you from drawing your weapon and immobilize one of your arms, making it harder for you to defend yourself. 2. The second downside is that when struck from the front, the weapon’s grip is pointing away, toward the attacker. This position makes it easier for the intruder to get their hands on the grip of your gun and pull it out of the holster.
Defensive Rating:
Front: 2/5
Sides: 3/5
Rear: 4/5
Ideal Usage: When driving or sitting for extended periods of time.

Hip Holster

Usually, a hip holster is attached to the user’s belt and carried on its dominant side. While no holster is fully defensible, though remaining fairly defensible from the rear, the hip holster offers you the most leverage over your weapon as you protect yourself from frontal and side assaults. This is also easy to wear all-around, with both standing and sitting for long periods of time. Hip holsters are known to be the most defensible from front or side assault because, with your primary hand, you can apply downward pressure to your holster to keep anyone from taking it while protecting yourself with the other hand. This applies to appendix holsters too, but not to the same degree. Hip holsters are considered to be the most defensible from front or side attack since you can apply downward pressure to your holster with your primary hand to prevent someone from taking it while defending yourself with the other hand. This also refers to appendix holsters but not to the same degree.
Defensive Rating:
Front: 5/5
Sides: 5/5
Rear: 4/5
Ideal Usage: every day carry.

Appendix Holster

The holster in the Appendix puts the gun in front of your chest. This type of holster is a little more defensible than a shoulder holster because you don’t need to stretch your arm around your body to draw. However, users of this holster run the risk of an attacker catching their gun hand mid-draw, preventing them from clearing the holster and restricting the freedom of the dominant hand to use it in self-defense. As with the hip holster, if they strike from the front of the dominant hand, a 90-degree twist will keep the arm facing away from the attacker. The appendix holster is very defensible from rear assaults because it’s inaccessible to the attacker. Appendix holsters are suitable for people who spend a great deal of time on their feet. The appendix holster is not recommended for people who sit often and for long periods of time since it is not as secure when bent at the waist. Defensive Rating:
Front: 4/5
Sides: 4/5
Rear: 5/5
Ideal Usage: When you will be on your feet for a prolonged period of time, with few opportunities to sit.

Cross-Draw Holster

The Cross-Draw holster is kept on the shooter’s waist, on their non-dominant side, facing forward with the pistol’s butt. This holster style is often used in western films. A cross-draw holster’s key advantage is the ease of drawing from a seated position with your dominant hand, or with your supporting hand if your dominant hand is immobilized. Many people who have had shoulder surgery and are unable to reach back to draw from a hip holster opt instead to use a cross-draw holster because it is easier to draw from. The cross-draw, however, bears much of the same drawbacks as the shoulder holster. As with the shoulder holster, in order to grab the weapon, you must stretch your dominant hand across your body, leaving your dominant hand vulnerable to being pressed to your body by an attacker attacking from the fore. Like a shoulder belt, the firearm’s butt also faces an attacker approaching from the head, making it harder for them to catch it. Cross-draw holsters are relatively more rear- and side defensible than frontal attacks, but with your dominant hand reaching across your chest, you’re left vulnerable to attack your dominant side.
Defensive Rating:
Front: 2/5
Sides: 3/5
Rear: 4/5
Ideal Usage: When driving or sitting for extended periods of time.

Small-of-the-Back Holster

The gun is positioned in the middle of your lower back with a small-of-the-back holster, and firmly canted in the direction of your dominant side with the pistol’s butt facing upwards. This holster style has many advantages including ease of concealment with limited printing. Small-of-the-back holsters fit well for carrying on a regular basis and are definitely highly defensible from both front and hand. They do have some disadvantages, however, as with any holster. Since it’s like a hip holster, but fixed at the place of 6 o’clock, your dominant hand will need to stretch behind your back to draw the weapon. Consequently, your attacker could push your back to a wall while drawing in a confined space, making it difficult for you to draw, or grab your arm entirely behind your back. If you are pushed or fell and landed on your back, the spinal trauma may be caused by the effect of landing on the gun. In a rear attack, the dominant hand would have trouble keeping hold of the weapon and holding it in its holster. Finally, the user can feel some discomfort while sitting or driving for extended periods of time due to the location of the arms.
Defensive Rating:
Front: 4/5
Sides: 4/5
Rear: 3/5
Ideal Usage: every day carry that doesn’t involve confined spaces or sitting for extended periods of time.

Ankle Holster

Usually, the ankle holster lies on the inside of the non-dominant ankle or the outer ankle. Most people prefer the inside of the non-dominant ankle as it is easy to draw from this position while down on one knee, for example, while tying a shoelace, and printing is much less noticeable. The ankle holster is therefore unique because it is not easily accessible to anyone, including the owner. Most attackers won’t know you’re holding a pistol in a holster for the leg, leaving surprise on your hand. In the best of situations, however, falling to one knee to draw an ankle gun when grappling with a determined attacker is hard to do, and leaves significant parts of your body (such as your head) completely defenseless. Conversely, pulling the non-dominant knee up so you can draw without having to crouch leaves you standing on one leg and unable to balance. In other words, the ankle gun is useful when you notice that a threat is imminent but you might not be able to draw it until the fight is over for close-quarters defensive situations like a mugging.
Defensive Rating:
Front: 4/5
Sides: 4/5
Rear: 4/5
Ideal Usage: every day carry for threats with some advanced warning (i.e. audible gunshots in your area)

In summary

The hip holster has the most advantage over a frontal attack, closely followed by the appendix holster. Both shoulder and cross-draw holsters are vulnerable against a frontal assault but relatively defensible from the rear, and easily accessible from a sitting position. Small-of-the-back holsters are defensible from the front and sides, but very vulnerable from the rear, and in a position which can cause significant bodily harm if you fall and land on it. Ankle holsters are relatively concealable and easily defensible, but hard for anyone, even the user, to reach. People who spend a lot of time sitting or driving would suggest holsters for the shoulder or cross-draw, while people who spend a lot of time on their feet would choose appendix or hip holsters. The hip holster is easy to wear all-around while being justifiably defensible on all sides. If you have any information or an experience to share? We would love to hear from you!